1st December 2011

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Revised Sentences

Before: The trauma was unexpected, the person experiencing the trauma was unprepared, and still there was nothing the person could do to prevent the trauma from happening. 

After: The trauma was unexpected and the person experiencing it was unprepared, yet there was nothing the person could do to prevent the trauma from happening. 

Before: What they have felt and experienced through service can completely alter a veteran’s transition into what we consider to be the average, mainstream American adult. 

After: What soldiers feel and experience during service can alter their transition into becoming what we consider the average, mainstream American adult. 

Before: For soldiers who left home at a young age, they never had the chance to delve into what we would think of as the role of a typical adult: holding a job, geting married, starting up a family, and the like. 

After: Soldiers who left home at a young age never had the chance to delve into what we consider to be the role of a typical adult: holding a job, geting married, starting a family.  

4th November 2011

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4th November 2011

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4th November 2011

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4th November 2011

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Eugene Richards is a Documentary photographer. These photos come from his project “War is Personal” which illustrates the effects of war upon returning home.

Eugene Richards is a Documentary photographer. These photos come from his project “War is Personal” which illustrates the effects of war upon returning home.

25th October 2011

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The Project Progression

At the moment I forsee the paper/project/web-text as a progression. Using the interviews as a springboard, I’ll try to give an overview of what occurs in a war-zone. Then I’ll look into the effects this has on the brain and how these effects affect a soldier long term. From there I will bring into back to specific assimilation problems. Starting with the why, I’ll work my way back toward the end result.

Right now, I’m still a little confused about what aspects of the project Tyler and I are responsible for together and those I’m responsible for by myself. 

25th October 2011

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Effects on the Brain

"Effects of Emotional Trauma on the Brain During a stressful event, the sympathetic nervous system activates the fight-or-flight response. The stress hormone cortisol is released. Normally, when the stessor goes away, the parasympathetic nervous system responds and returns the body to normal. However, in a traumatic event, which is caused by unusually large amounts of stress, excess cortisol is released in the body. That large amount of cortisol has negative effects on the brain, damaging the CA3 neurons in the hippocampus (Nixon, Nishith and Resick).”

Forming new memories and attention span is affected after traumatic events. 

http://www.brighthub.com/education/special/articles/66806.aspx

25th October 2011

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Breaking down the definition of trauma

“Regardless of its source, an emotional trauma contains three common elements:

• it was unexpected; 
• the person was unprepared; and 
• there was nothing the person could do to prevent it from happening.”

This website deals with types, differences in psychological and emotional trauma, how it’s triggered, differing severity levels, and how it’s treated. 

http://healingresources.info/emotional_trauma_overview.htm

25th October 2011

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Dealing with Emotional Trauma at Home

“Remember that they are trained to be self reliant, and that they usually come to you as the last resort.”

It’s interesting that the article makes the point. I hadn’t ever considered this idea that the soldier mentality is what stands in the way of their treatment. 


http://www.eftforvets.com/921/understanding-emotional-triggers-of-war-trauma/

20th October 2011

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I’ve tried three times to get this graph to copy over and tumblr just won’t have it. I strongly encourage you to click this link and check the graph. It deals with what Marines and Army men saw in Afghanistan and Iraq. If they were shot at, saw someone die, knew someone who died, their location was bombed etc. 

http://www.ptsd.va.gov/public/pages/overview-mental-health-effects.asp